FORMER ORANGE COUNTY CHIEF TECHNOLOGY OFFICER CONVICTED OF RECEIVING $5,000 BRIBE TO INFLUENCE COUNTY WORK CONTRACTS

OCDASeal

Orange County District Attorney
Press Release


Tony Rackauckas, District Attorney
401 Civic Center Drive West
Santa Ana, CA 92701

For Immediate Release
Case # 06CF0465


 


November 6, 2008

Susan Kang Schroeder
Public Affairs Counsel
Office: 714-347-8408
Cell: 714-292-2718

Farrah Emami
Spokesperson
Office: 714-347-8405
Cell: 714-323-4486

FORMER ORANGE COUNTY CHIEF TECHNOLOGY OFFICER CONVICTED OF RECEIVING $5,000 BRIBE TO INFLUENCE COUNTY WORK CONTRACTS

 

WESTMINSTER – An Orange County jury found former Orange County Chief Technology Officer guilty of soliciting and accepting a $5,000 bribe and using his position of authority to influence work contracts for the County. Reza Khayyami, 49, Mission Viejo, was convicted of one felony count of being an officer asking for and receiving a bribe. He faces a maximum sentence of four years in state prison. Khayyami will be sentenced on Friday, Dec. 19, 2008, at 8:30 a.m. in Department W-9, West Justice Center, Westminster. 

 

In March 2003, Khayyami was hired as the Chief Technology Officer for Orange County.  In the spring of that year, the defendant met Allen Fahami, who was owner and president of Intratek. Intratek had provided computer systems support to multiple County agencies since 1991 through contracts amounting to approximately $10 million. 

 

In the summer of 2004, Fahami asked Khayyami why Intratek’s contracts with the County were being substantially reduced. The defendant, whose job gave him influence over Orange County technological contracts, told Fahami that he wanted to be paid 2 percent of all new County contracts in exchange for assisting him in getting additional work. Fahami declined. 

 

In November 2004, Fahami spoke to the defendant on the phone and asked again how to resolve the issue of a decreased number of County contracts. Khayyami asked Fahami to pay him $5,000. Khayyami persisted and Fahami eventually agreed to pay the bribe for fear that Khayyami could further hurt his business if he did not cooperate. 

 

Khayyami provided Fahami with a false name, social security number, and address to cover up the financial trail. Fahami told the defendant that he needed legitimate personal information so that Intratek could submit the appropriate tax forms. Khayyami then provided Fahami with a false name and personal information. 

 

In December 2004, the $5,000 check to Khayyami was deposited. Khayyami then created a fake work invoice for Fahami to account for the payment. Fahami did not receive additional business as a result of the $5,000 payment, but the money was never returned to him.

 

In April 2005, Fahami told an employee about paying the $5,000 to Khayyami. The employee, a former Orange County Sheriff’s deputy, reported the incident to the Orange County Sheriff’s Department. For unrelated reasons, the defendant was no longer a County employee at the time.

 

Deputy District Attorney Andre Manssourian of the Special Prosecutions Unit is prosecuting this case.