OCDA TO OPPOSE PAROLE OF INMATE CONVICTED OF KILLING 67-YEAR-OLD WOMAN IN 2000 DRIVE-BY SHOOTING

For Immediate Release

              





February 10, 2014

Susan Kang Schroeder
Chief of Staff
Office: 714-347-8408
Cell: 714-292-2718

Farrah Emami
Spokesperson
Office: 714-347-8405
Cell: 714-323-4486

OCDA TO OPPOSE PAROLE OF INMATE CONVICTED OF KILLING 67-YEAR-OLD WOMAN IN 2000 DRIVE-BY SHOOTING

 

SANTA ANA – Orange County District Attorney (OCDA) Tony Rackauckas is opposing the parole of a man convicted of murdering a 67-year-old woman in a drive-by shooting in 2000. Carlos Eduardo Sanchez, 30, is currently being held at Calipatria State Prison, Calipatria. Sanchez was sentenced Sept. 20, 2002, to 15 years to life in state prison after he was found guilty of one felony count of second degree murder. The case was originally prosecuted by Senior Deputy District Attorney Sonia Balleste. Sanchez is scheduled for a parole hearing tomorrow, Feb. 11, 2014, at 8:30 a.m. at the prison before the Board of Parole Hearings, California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation.

 

Senior Deputy District Attorney Rebecca Olivieri will appear at the hearing to oppose Sanchez’s parole.

 

Circumstances of the Case

At approximately 9:50 p.m. on April 22, 2000, then-16-year-old Sanchez and two of his fellow gang members, 25-year-old Jorge Martinez and 23-year-old Antonio Leal, drove through the residential area of a rival gang with the intent to fire upon rivals. The inmate and his fellow gang members shot several rounds toward a house where the rival gang members were standing outside.

 

As they drove by and shot into a neighboring house, the men murdered 67-year-old Adela Rios while she was inside her home.

 

The three men fled the scene at a high rate of speed, but ultimately lost control of the vehicle and crashed into a building and proceeded to flee on foot. Sanchez and Martinez were the only two apprehended. Leal escaped and currently has a warrant for his arrest in this case.

 

Lack of Insight, Rehabilitation, and a Threat to Public Safety

While in state prison, Sanchez has been cited for six prison rule violations, including two violations for possession of a deadly weapon, two violations for possession of alcohol, and one violation each of theft and the manufacture of an electrical outlet.

 

Sanchez has failed to show complete insight and remorse into his life offense. Rather than taking responsibility for the murder, Sanchez continues to deny that he was aware of the shooting that was g